Editor-in-chief
Maria Stella Graziani

Deputy Director
Martina Zaninotto

Associate Editors
Ferruccio Ceriotti
Davide Giavarina
Bruna Lo Sasso
Giampaolo Merlini
Martina Montagnana
Andrea Mosca
Paola Pezzati
Rossella Tomaiuolo
Matteo Vidali

International Advisory Board Khosrow Adeli Canada
Sergio Bernardini Italy
Marcello Ciaccio Italy
Eleftherios Diamandis Canada
Philippe Gillery France
Kjell Grankvist Sweden
Hans Jacobs The Netherlands
Eric Kilpatrick UK
Magdalena Krintus Poland
Giuseppe Lippi Italy
☩Howard Morris Australia
Mario Plebani Italy
Sverre Sandberg Norway
Ana-Maria Simundic Croatia
☩Jill Tate Australia
Tommaso Trenti Italy
Cas Weykamp The Netherlands
Maria Willrich USA
Paul Yip Canada


Publisher
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano

Responsible Editor
Giuseppe Agosta

Editorial Secretary
Arianna Lucini Paioni
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano
Tel. 0245498282
email: biochimica.clinica@sibioc.it



Area soci
Non possiedi o non ricordi la password!
Clicca qui

BC: Articoli scritti da C. Mattiuzzi

Impatto epidemiologico della patologia ischemica del miocardio in Italia
Epidemiologic burden of ischemic heart disease in Italy
G. Lippi  |  C. Mattiuzzi  |  C. Bovo  |  G. Cervellin  | 
<p>Background: this article provides an updated overview on the current epidemiologic burden of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Italy.<br />Methods: an electronic search was carried out in the Global Health Data Exchange (GHDx) registry, using the keyword &ldquo;ischemic heart disease&rdquo;, for retrieving recent information (year 2017) on incidence, prevalence, health loss (expressed as disability-adjusted life year, DALYs) and mortality of IHD in Italy.<br />Results: the cumulative incidence, prevalence and mortality of IHD in Italy are 0.38%, 3.47% and 0.16% respectively, whilst the impact on health loss is 1.11 million DALYs (6.73% of total DALYs). Incidence, prevalence and DALYs are higher in men than in women, whilst mortality is only marginally higher in males. Overall, IHD is the first cause of death in Italy (15.5% of all deaths). During the last three decades the incidence has constantly increased (+30%), whilst DALYs have declined in both sexes by ~30%. Mortality for IHD steadily decreased in men (-13%), whilst it remained almost unchanged in women. The curve of incidence of IHD in Italy peaks between 60-84 years in men and between 75-94 years in women. The mortality curve of IHD in Italy peaks in both sexes between 85-94 years. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes are the leading risk factors for IHD in Italy.<br />Conclusions: IHD still poses a substantial clinical, social and economic burden in Italy.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 44(2) S048-S053
Contributi Scientifici - Scientific Papers
 
Procalcitonina in Terapia Intensiva: più certezze che dubbi
Procalcitonin in intensive care unit: more confidence than hesitation
G. Lippi  |  C. Mattiuzzi  | 
Biochimica Clinica ; 42(2) 180-182
Lettere all'Editore - Letters to the Editor
 
I laboratori clinici nell’emergenza dei focolai epidemici infettivi: Ebola e oltre
Clinical laboratories and infectious outbreak emergencies: Ebola and beyond
G. Lippi  |  C. Mattiuzzi  |  M. Plebani  | 
Biochimica Clinica ; 38(6) 604-606
Editoriale - Editorial
 
Proposta di una “checklist” per il prelievo di sangue venoso
Proposal of a checklist for venous blood collection
<p>The collection of venous blood is central in clinical laboratory&nbsp;activity. Although there is widespread perception that this practice is simple and free of complications and side effects,&nbsp;it is undeniable that the vast majority of laboratory errors arises from ignorance, incompetence or negligence during&nbsp;venipuncture. It has hence become advisable to prepare a document in simplified form of checklist, consisting of a&nbsp;concise but comprehensive list of activities to be completed or verified in order to prevent errors during venous blood&nbsp;collection. In the intention of authors, this synthetic checklist is a modular tool, adaptable to different local contexts,&nbsp;it can be easily and gradually implemented, it is supported by scientific evidence and consensus of experts and&nbsp;created with the support of different healthcare professionals and it is adherent to the best practices and requires&nbsp;minimal resources for implementation. It is reasonable to assume that this checklist may be able to withstand system&nbsp;and individual changes, strengthening the standards for safety of both operators and patients, limiting potential failure&nbsp;patterns. We hope that the checklist may be implemented in all healthcare facilities where routine venous blood&nbsp;collection is performed, after adaptation to suit characteristics of local organization.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 37(4) 312-317
Documenti SIBioC - SIBioC Documents
 
Guida sintetica alla diagnostica della malattia da coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19)
Concise guide to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnostics
<p>Several months after its emergence, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is still prepotently disrupting health, societies and economies worldwide. The current approach for diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 remains based on identification of viral RNA by means of molecular biology techniques in upper or lower respiratory tracts specimens. Nevertheless, the development of immune response against the virus may also provide valuable diagnostic information. The paradigmatic kinetics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in patients with COVID-19 would allow to conclude that serological testing shall not replace viral RNA detection in diagnosing acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, but may instead remain an essential tool for identifying patients who have been infected and have developed an immune response, as well as for monitoring the progress of herd immunity. For this purpose, the choice of the antigens used for constructing the immunoassays appears critical, as these shall use epitopes towards which neutralizing antibodies could be generated. Other important aspects in serological testing encompass the absence of cross-reactivity with other coronaviruses, the ability to distinguish the antibody class (i.e. IgG, IgA and/or IgM), quantitative assessment, wide range of linearity and low imprecision at diagnostic thresholds. A finalaspect, almost essential for both clinical and public health purposes, is the evidence of analytical and clinical validation before each method enters clinical practice.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 17(1) 003-004
COVID-19 - COVID-19