Editor-in-chief
Maria Stella Graziani

Deputy Director
Martina Zaninotto

Associate Editors
Ferruccio Ceriotti
Davide Giavarina
Bruna Lo Sasso
Giampaolo Merlini
Martina Montagnana
Andrea Mosca
Paola Pezzati
Rossella Tomaiuolo
Matteo Vidali

International Advisory Board Khosrow Adeli Canada
Sergio Bernardini Italy
Marcello Ciaccio Italy
Eleftherios Diamandis Canada
Philippe Gillery France
Kjell Grankvist Sweden
Hans Jacobs The Netherlands
Eric Kilpatrick UK
Magdalena Krintus Poland
Giuseppe Lippi Italy
☩Howard Morris Australia
Mario Plebani Italy
Sverre Sandberg Norway
Ana-Maria Simundic Croatia
☩Jill Tate Australia
Tommaso Trenti Italy
Cas Weykamp The Netherlands
Maria Willrich USA
Paul Yip Canada


Publisher
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano

Responsible Editor
Giuseppe Agosta

Editorial Secretary
Arianna Lucini Paioni
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano
Tel. 0245498282
email: biochimica.clinica@sibioc.it



Area soci
Non possiedi o non ricordi la password!
Clicca qui

BC: Articoli scritti da M. Caputo

Diagnostica di laboratorio del rischio nefrolitiasico
Laboratory diagnostics of the nephrolithasic risk.
<p>Laboratory diagnostics of the nephrolithasic risk. The urinary metabolic study is carried out for the evaluation of patients at the first episode of lithiasis but mainly for the monitoring of patients on therapy in order to prevent lithiasis recurrences. Following the indication of the general practitioner or of the nephrologist, our laboratory performs the analysis of both daily and first morning urine to extrapolate the tendency (relative supra-saturation) to form the most common urinary calculi (calcium oxalate, mono calcium phosphate acid, uric acid). In this paper we review the role of the different ions and urinary components in favoring or inhibiting stone formation. Then, we present the whole workflow for the characterization of the tendency of kidney stones formation, from the instructions to the patient for the collection of urines to the interpretative report. Regarding the analytical issues, we briefly present the methods, not commercially available, developed in our center that can be adapted to common biochemical analyzers allowing a complete characterization of the lithiasic tendency without the use of more specialized instrumentation.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 42(5) 327-334
Opinioni - Opinions
 
Note metodologiche sull’acquisizione e sull’uso dei sistemi chiusi sottovuoto per il prelievo, il trattamento e la conservazione dei campioni ematici venosi destinati alla diagnostica di laboratorio
Methodological notes on acquisition and use of close evacuated systems for collection, handling and storage of venous blood samples for laboratory diagnostics
M. Plebani  |  M. Caputo  |  D. Giavarina  |  G. Lippi  | 
<p>Evacuated systems for collection of venous blood&nbsp;are integrated systems of medical and in vitro diagnostic medical devices regulated under European Directives and&nbsp;Italian Legislative Decrees. Both Directives and Decrees endorse the requirement that the whole combination of&nbsp;devices, representing an integrated apparatus, must be safe and not impair the specific performance of each single&nbsp;device. According to mandatory requirements, manufacturers must ensure full compatibility between each component&nbsp;of the system, while the users are responsible for verifying the compatibility of different devices in order to avoid&nbsp;potential quality and safety problems. The acquisition of various devices from different manufacturers may lead to&nbsp;combinations that are not validated by manufacturers themselves and are thus expected to be validated and verified&nbsp;by the users to demonstrate that the system remains safe and will not impair the performance of the individual&nbsp;elements. Therefore, the possibility of purchasing different devices separately should be carefully weighted in terms&nbsp;of risk-benefit, taking into consideration the additional costs of the validation/verification process that should be&nbsp;carried out by the potential user. Since preanalytical problems are the major source of errors in the total testing&nbsp;process, the selection and acquisition of close evacuated systems for blood collection should be considered a critical&nbsp;issue for assuring quality, safety and efficiency of the preanalytical phase of laboratory diagnostics and, therefore, of&nbsp;the total testing process.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 37(4) 303-311
Documenti SIBioC - SIBioC Documents
 
Proposta di una “checklist” per il prelievo di sangue venoso
Proposal of a checklist for venous blood collection
<p>The collection of venous blood is central in clinical laboratory&nbsp;activity. Although there is widespread perception that this practice is simple and free of complications and side effects,&nbsp;it is undeniable that the vast majority of laboratory errors arises from ignorance, incompetence or negligence during&nbsp;venipuncture. It has hence become advisable to prepare a document in simplified form of checklist, consisting of a&nbsp;concise but comprehensive list of activities to be completed or verified in order to prevent errors during venous blood&nbsp;collection. In the intention of authors, this synthetic checklist is a modular tool, adaptable to different local contexts,&nbsp;it can be easily and gradually implemented, it is supported by scientific evidence and consensus of experts and&nbsp;created with the support of different healthcare professionals and it is adherent to the best practices and requires&nbsp;minimal resources for implementation. It is reasonable to assume that this checklist may be able to withstand system&nbsp;and individual changes, strengthening the standards for safety of both operators and patients, limiting potential failure&nbsp;patterns. We hope that the checklist may be implemented in all healthcare facilities where routine venous blood&nbsp;collection is performed, after adaptation to suit characteristics of local organization.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 37(4) 312-317
Documenti SIBioC - SIBioC Documents
 
Raccomandazioni di consenso SIBioC-SIMeL per la rilevazione e gestione dei campioni emolisati e utilizzo dell'indice di emolisi
SIBioC-SIMeL consensus recommendations for the identification and management of hemolysed specimens and the implementation of hemolysis index
<p><strong>SIBioC-SIMeL consensus recommendations for the identification and management of hemolysed specimens</strong><br /><strong>and the implementation of hemolysis index.</strong> The presence of hemolysis in a biological blood sample is mainly<br />caused by hemolytic anemia or hemolysis in vitro. The latter is caused by inappropriate collection and processing of biological samples, which may affect the reliability of test results. Hemolysis is assessed by free hemoglobin quantification, whose limit is 0.02 g/L in plasma and 0.05 g/L in serum, and visually observed when the concentration of free hemoglobin exceeds 0.30 g/L. Since hemolysis is the most frequent cause of unsuitable biological samples in clinical laboratories, with a prevalence approaching 3% of all received samples, these recommendations have been drafted specifically to assist laboratory professionals in detection and management of hemolysed specimens. In summary, the recommended approach is based on: (i) systematic detection and quantification of hemolysis, by visual inspection and subsequent quantification of the hemolysis index on all samples with visually detectable hemolysis; (ii) immediate notification to the referring department of the presence of hemolysis in the sample, as locally determined; (iii) suppression of all results affected by the presence and/or degree of hemolysis; and (iv) timely request of a second sample, on which the previously deleted tests can be performed.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 35(6) 481-490
DOCUMENTI SIBioC - DOCUMENTI SIBioC